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  • Grappling damage

    It's probably premature to talk about this before the new draft comes out, but here's my thoughts on grappling.

    Grappling is essentially just another type of melee attack. As such, it should consist of a task (attack) roll and an effect (damage) roll. In this case, however, the task roll is made with Athletics rather than Fighting and the effect roll is an opposed Strength roll rather than a roll vs the target's Toughness. (Jury's out on whether these should be opposed unarmed damage rolls instead of Strength.) I think this mitigates the Thor vs Hulk issues raised in other threads and can be be applied to Push tests as well.

    Thoughts?

  • #2
    Generally, grappling isn't just another attack. While causing damage eventually becomes a goal, the typical goals are a) prevent the foe from moving, b) prevent the foe from "doing stuff".
    Focusing on the rib crushing, neck snapping, and limb wrenching effects to the detriment of restraining is a bad design choice.

    If you mean to turn the restraint and pinning aspects into the damage then your proposal might work. It's a workable model but two opposed rolls gives the defender two chances to stop the action from happening, including spending bennies (since defenders roll after aggressors), giving the rules a pro-defender bias.
    I have noticed that having two opposed rolls for a task is one roll too many - it just slows everything down to the point that people disengage and stop using the mechanic.
    I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

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    • paladin2019
      paladin2019 commented
      Editing a comment
      I didn't explain well again. The Athletics roll is against the target's Parry, like any other attack. This establishes the grapple and there's nothing the target can do about it except improve his Parry. The opposed Strength is the "hold-'em" roll, replacing the current opposed Athletics-Strength roll. One normal roll and one opposed roll instead of two normal rolls.

  • #3
    Huh. So great swordsmen are also masters of defensive grappling. And holding a main gauche helps resist grappling but a great sword doesn't.
    I'll need to think about it more, but that doesn't seem right to my first impression.
    I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

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    • #4
      So you're suggesting that maybe it's a Parry based on Athletics? Or maybe it's still a normal Parry because it's still avoiding letting an enemy get hold of you.
      Last edited by paladin2019; 12-15-2018, 04:26 PM.

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