Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Racial Abilities and Notes from my Urban Fantasy Zombie Apocalypse Game

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Racial Abilities and Notes from my Urban Fantasy Zombie Apocalypse Game

    On a PBP gaming site, I'm using Savage Worlds to run a zombie apocalypse game. This is set in an urban fantasy world. The apocalypse swept up the world's supernatural creatures just as much as it did mortals the world over. Now these beings, from vampires, werewolves, witches, psychics, and more, all struggle to survive a world far more dangerous than any they have ever known. Note that I sort of combined different racial packages and rules from different sourcebooks, plus some rules of my own gleaned from long experience working and playing in the industry, to create these racial abilities. I also was willing to go a little more powerful than the usual.

    In this game, mortal characters begin play with two Edges, instead of one, and are more broadly competent, lacking the powers but also the weaknesses of these other creature types. Plus, they don't have as much stuff to spend XP on, so they tend to become better faster at a broader range of things. Plus, sometimes it's fun to play the underdog.

    Creatures of the Night
    Not all survivors are human. Vampires, werewolves, witches, even the occasional sentient Rotter, all haunt the undead-infested world. Many have their own unnatural hungers and needs, while some prey on both living and dead. Most just want to survive, the same as people do.

    Here are the rules for playable supernatural character types. Each of these creature types is in many ways more powerful than mere mortals, but have their own drawbacks to consider. The dark powers of the world exact their toll on everyone, be it in flesh and blood or something more ethereal and everlasting.

    Dhampir
    The half-human offspring of vampires (or, rarely, survivors of a vampire attack) are the mysterious and alluring dhampiri. These men and women, transformed by their supernatural heritage, possess a preternatural grace and power, but also some of the vampire's weaknesses. Their passions run hot and they hate vampires with an instinctive ferocity, but they are effective against the undead.

    All Dhampir characters possess the following racial package:

    Dark Charm: Idealized and alluring both physically and mentally, Dhampir gain +2 Charisma.
    Graceful and Athletic: Agility D6, Strength D6.
    Immunity: Dhampir are immune to diseases, including the Plague. Zombies will still attack the character.
    Keen Senses: Notice D6. Ignore penalties for Dim and Dark lighting. Can hear frequencies beyond that of human range, and can identify and track creatures by scent.
    Sense Undead: Dhampir can instinctively sense the presence of the undead, be they zombies, ghosts, or vampires. This operates within a radius of about 100 feet, and only gives a general feeling of presence. A successful Notice roll can tell general direction, and with a raise can discern numbers. Two raises on a Notice roll tells the Dhampir the type of undead present. Dhampir always know if it's a vampire in the vicinity.

    Blood Hunger: Minor Habit Hindrance (urge to drink fresh blood when available). Drinking blood causes the Dhampir to exude a predatory aura, reducing Charisma to -4 for 6 hours and also forcing them to make a Spirit test to avoid drinking more fresh blood when it is available.
    Enemy: Vampires and Dhampiri hate one another to the point of almost instant bloodshed.
    Wood Weakness: +4 damage from weapons made of wood.

    Racial Edges
    Dhampir characters can choose the following racial Edges. They may also purchase the Arcane Background (Witchcraft) Edge.

    Call of the Wild • Seasoned (Spirit D8+) • Once/day, make a Spirit test. Success summons a single specimen of the chosen animal. Each raise adds another animal. All animals called assist the Dhampir until next sunrise or sunset or until they take a wound. Swarms count as a single animal. This may be taken multiple times, selecting a different animal each time.

    Graceful Leap • Novice (Agility D8+) • Base horizontal jump of 2", run and go jump of 4". Successful Strength test adds +2". Halve falling damage, and take no damage from falls of 20 feet or less.

    Vampiric Healing • Seasoned (Vigor D8+) • Though not as tough as their full-vampire kin, Dhampir can heal fast. They recover one wound an hour, and may recover one wound instantly by drinking blood (and inflicting a wound) on mortal creatures. Animals can only offer a single wound heal this way.

    Necromancer
    Necromancers channel the dark energies that now infuse the world to command the undead. They can use their powers to raise zombies of their own or take lordship over existing ones. Some seek to set themselves up as kings of the dead, while others use their dark magic to put ghosts to rest and help good people survive a dangerous world.

    Necromancers are usually human. All Necromancers possess the following package:

    Arcane Training: Necromancers gain the Arcane Background (Magic) Edges and the Necromancer Professional Edge. They must qualify for the latter with their starting points.
    Undead Lordship: As an alternative to raising a corpse as a zombie, Necromancers may use the Zombie power to take control of an existing zombie. This requires a Spirit roll against the zombie's Spirit. Success means that the zombie acts under the Necromancer's control, just as a raised zombie would. This power may affect animal zombies of human size or smaller (including swarms), but requires one raise to affect something as large as a lion, or two raises to affect hulking bear-sized zombies.

    Deathly Aura: The powers that a Necromancer wields transform her in some way. The living can feel this chill and instinctively recoil. The character suffers -4 Charisma with the living. Conversely, they gain +2 Charisma with the undead.

    Psionics
    In the world before the Plague, rare individuals possessed true powers of the mind. These psionic abilities allowed a Psion to effect change in the world around herself through pure will. Even now, psionic powers allow survivors to see into places where danger (or supplies) might lurk, levitate objects, or stranger things. Such powers are invaluable in surviving (or preying on other survivors), but one recommendation....

    Don't read the minds of the dead. Many have gone insane or become zombies themselves in the process.

    Only humans can be Psions. All Psions gain the following Racial Package:

    Iron Will: Spirit D6.
    Latent Potential: Psions gain the Arcane Background (Psionics) Edge.

    Vampires
    Vampires are undead creatures who feed on the living — not unlike the zombies that infest the world. Unlike most zombies, Vampires are intelligent and powerful, capable of great physical and magical prowess. Vampires are cursed, however, and cannot bear the light of the sun, and their immortality is taken from stolen lifeblood. In a world full of zombies upon which a Vampire cannot feed, no Vampire can afford to have humans go extinct — or devour them all herself.

    Vampires may learn the Arcane Background (Magic) and Necromancer Edges, following all normal rules. All Vampires possess the following Racial Package:

    Blood Healing: Vampires gain a Blood Pool, starting at 1 point. They may spend 1 Blood Point to heal a wound. Each Rank increase also increases the Vampire's Blood Pool maximum by 1.
    Keen Senses: Notice D6. Ignore penalties for Dim and Dark lighting. Can hear frequencies beyond that of human range, and can identify and track creatures by scent.
    Strength of the Damned: D8 Strength, D8 Vigor.
    Undead: +2 Toughness, +2 to recover from Shaken. No additional damage from Called Shots; immune to disease and poison; does not suffer wound penalties. Additionally, normal zombies register the Vampire as simply another undead and will not attack her. They may defend themselves if attacked.

    Thirst: The vampire must drink at least a pint of fresh blood once per day. This is treated like the Habit (Major) Hindrance. This means the Vampire spends 1 Blood Point each day to wake up.
    Weakness (Sunlight): Vampires suffer 2d10 damage per round of exposure to sunlight. Armor does not protect against this damage, but completely covering from head to toe can reduce it. Even so, the Vampire's Strength and Vigor are reduced by 2 steps in sunlight.
    Weakness (Wood): Vampires take +4 damage from wooden weapons.

    Racial Edges
    Vampires can learn the following Racial Edges.

    Claws • Novice • Can grow claws that inflict Strength + D6 damage.
    Hypnotic Gaze • Novice, Spirit D8+ • The Vampire can transfix a victim with her gaze. When attempting to use Persuasion on an opponent, the Vampire may first make a Spirit test. On success, the Vampire makes the target treated as Neutral for the Persuasions test. With a raise, they are treated as Friendly. On a failure, the initial reaction moves one step toward Hostile.
    Unholy Sustenance • Seasoned • The Vampire only needs to spend 1 Blood Point every 3 days, rather than every day.
    Vampiric Invulnerability • Seasoned, Vigor D10+ • The Vampire can only be Shaken by weapons that are not silver, wood, or magical (the attacks of zombies count) — not wounded.
    Last edited by Claire Redfield; 09-08-2018, 02:44 AM.

  • #2

    Werewolves
    Myth has long ascribed some men and women the power to change into animal form. Werewolves are those who are blessed (or cursed) with the ability to take a lupine form and wield bestial might. Werewolves tend to run in packs, using their peerless hunting abilities to bring down prey enough to feed the pack. Werewolves are physically powerful, but also find challenges surviving in a world where food is scarce and the undead want to eat them most of all.

    All Werewolves possess the following Racial Package:

    Immunity: Werewolves are immune to diseases, including the Plague. Zombies will still attack the character. They also gain +2 to resist poisons.
    Regeneration: Werewolves heal incredibly quickly, recovering 1 wound an hour. Wounds inflicted by silver weapons can't be healed this way. They also recover a level of fatigue every hour (except by starvation; see below).
    Wolf Form: Werewolves may freely transform between human form and lupine form. In non-stressful situations, the transformation is automatic and quick. In dangerous chaos like battle, you must make a Spirit test (at -4 if no moon is in the sky or indoors). On a failure, the transformation requires three rounds. On success, the shift requires two rounds. With a raise, it's done in one round. With two raises, it's instant and the character can act normally in the same round.

    In Wolf Form, Werewolves gain the following traits:

    Claws & Fangs: Strength + D6 damage.
    Fleet-Footed: Increase Agility by 1 step. Roll a D10 when running instead of D6. Gain +2 Pace.
    Lupine Senses: +2 to Notice. No penalties from Dim or Dark lighting (but can't see in complete darkness). May identify and track others by scent.

    Insatiable Hunger: Werewolves must consume at least 3 to 5 pounds of food every 24 hours. If she can't, she suffers severe hunger. On the first day of hunger, the Werewolf makes a Vigor test at -2 penalty. Failure incurs a level of fatigue. Afterward, the Werewolf must make Vigor tests every 12 hours. At least one pound of food allows a hungry Werewolf to recover a level of Fatigue every hour, or every 12 hours after reaching Incapacitation.
    Silver Vulnerability: +4 damage from silver weapons.
    Vital Creatures: Werewolves have powerful vitality. Zombies will always prefer them over other prey given equal opportunity.

    Racial Edges
    Werewolves may purchase the following Racial Edges.

    Hybrid Beast Form • Seasoned, Vigor D8+ • The Werewolf may take on a bipedal lupine form that towers over normal people, possessed of tremendous strength and fury. While in Hybrid Form, increase Strength and Fighting by +2 die types. Maximum: D12 + 2. Charisma -4. This also causes Moon Fear (prompting a Fear roll at -2) in mortals who see them. While in Hybrid Form, the Werewolf cannot take any actions other than to smash and destroy.

    Shifting Mastery • Seasoned, Spirit D8+ • A werebeast with this Edge may transform at will, regardless of environment.

    Witches
    Witches channel the powers of spirits and the elements into magical spells. These spells can transform objects and sometimes creatures, summon raw elemental forces, allow the Witch to see beyond the means of normal vision, or even curse their foes. Witches have great power for good or evil, using their spells to survive in a dangerous world.

    While many other character types may learn magic, only mortal humans can become Witches. All Witches possess the following Racial Package:

    Arcane Training: Witches gain the Arcane Background (Magic) Edge. They can also gain anything with the Arcane Background (Witchcraft) requirements.
    Keen Mind: Smarts D6.
    Sense Magic: Witches gain the Detect/Conceal Arcana power (following all normal rules).
    Last edited by Claire Redfield; 09-08-2018, 02:46 AM.

    Comment


    • ValhallaGH
      ValhallaGH commented
      Editing a comment
      So, just sharing?

    • Claire Redfield
      Claire Redfield commented
      Editing a comment
      Sharing, can discuss the stuff if you want. I'm not 100% sold on all of these various traits, and would like to add more packages. What kinds of stuff like this have you used?

  • #3
    Interesting setting.

    The first thing I noticed is how wildly unbalanced the races are. I can provide more detailed breakdowns if you'd like, but this is my overall assessment:
    • Normal humans (with 2 Edges): +4
    • Dhampir: approximately +6
    • Necromancers: +4
    • Psionics: +4
    • Vampires: approximately +13
    • Werewolves: +7
    • Witches: +6 or +4 (See below)

    If the races were within one point of each other, I'd say it'd be fine, but as of right now, there is absolutely no reason to play anything other than a vampire. This is further bolstered by the vampire's ability to walk amongst the zombies unmolested, completely removing one of the settings main threats.

    Vampires need to be nerfed bigtime or simply removed as a playable race (unless everyone plays as one).
    _______

    There are also a few abilities that I think you should consider revisiting:

    • You give necromancers the Necromancer Edge for free, but only if they meet the requirements. This, frankly, is bad design. It creates a situation where all necromancers are essentially shoehorned, and any builds that deviate from that path are penalized. Either give them Edge or don't. Necromancers should probably also receive the zombie power for free as well, since that's their whole thing. Otherwise you can end up with necromancers that can't use their main ability.
    • The Blood Pool mechanic is unique to vampires, and I question if it's even needed as it causes the Thirst ability to be broken. I'm assuming 1 blood point is recovered by drinking a pint of blood, but you lable Thirst as a Major Habit, which links it to the Fatigue mechanic. Vampires also need to spend a blood point to even wake up, meaning you have two competing mechanics tied to the blood thirst. My suggestion is to get rid of Blood Pool, since it's an unique mechanic only used by vampires and just adds extra bookkeeping. Alternatively, don't classify Thirst as the Habit Hindrance and flesh out how Blood Pool works.
    • Hypnotic Gaze is redundant. The Edge lets a vampire make a Spirit roll to improve the target's disposition prior to using Persuasion... which is the skill used to change a target's disposition. Why not just have the Edge provide a +2 to Persuasion?
    • Wolf Form doesn't say if the transformation is a full round action or standard action. Can a werewolf mid-transformation still take other actions? If not, making them wait 2 whole turns to do anything is pretty brutal... and that's on a success. I would reduce all transformation times by one round. So a success makes the transformation take one round and a raise makes it instant, while a failure takes 2 rounds.
    • Hybrid Beast Form. You include a Charisma penalty to this Edge, but then say the beast cannot perform any actions other than destruction. So that Charisma penalty is entirely pointless since it will never see any use.
    • Witches... I'm unclear on their detect/conceal arcana ability. It says it "follows all normal rules", which I take to mean characters still need to spend PP to cast it and can suffer backlash, etc. But does this also mean that the power counts against the witch's starting powers, or is it an additional power?
    ______

    That's about it. I'd be interested to see more about this setting, if you're willing to share.

    Comment


    • #4
      I have to agree with Deskepticon that your racial balance is illusory. Note, I will be using the latest race creation rules (SFC / Savage Rifts) for my evaluations - older rules, including those in the core, price some of these abilities quite differently.

      Normal humans: +4
      • Two Edges: +2 per edge.
      Dhampir: +6 or +7, depending upon how one values "Sense Undead"
      • +2 Charisma: +1 per +1 Charisma. +2 total.
      • d6 Strength and Vigor: +2 per increased Attribute die type. +4 total.
      • Immune to Disease: +1. Good job noting how it interacts with the supernatural disease at the heart of the setting conflict. +1 total.
      • d6 in a skill and low light vision: +1 each. +2 total.
      • Sense Undead: this reads like an edge, so I price it as one (+2). Given the usefulness in this specific setting, I maintain that. For this same setting before the zombie apocalypse, it would probably have been a +1 ability.
      • Blood Hunger is a minor hindrance: -1 total.
      • Enemy is roughly a major hindrance: -2 total.
      • Weakness (+4) is a minor hindrance in the Superpowers Companion: -1 total.
      Necromancer: +4 or +5, depending upon Undead Lordship.
      • Two Edges: +2 per edge.
      • Undead Lordship: Cool ability to hijack existing zombies - though it does mean necromancer vs. necromancer turns into a normal fight between mortals - that gets a huge utility boost in setting. Normally this should be a +1 ability, but for this setting it would be +2 usefulness.
      • Dealthly Aura: Conditional charisma penalties, about a minor hindrance, -1.
      Psionics: +4
      • One Edges: +2 Each
      • d6 Spirit: +2
      Vampires: +22
      • Blood Healing: roughly as useful as being able to use the healing power self only. You should define the action for this one. +2 ability (estimated).
      • Keen Senses: d6 in a skill and low light vision, as Dhampir. Plus scent based tracking (+1). +3 total.
      • Strength of the Damned: d8 in two attributes, +2 per increased Attribute die type, so +4 per attribute. +8 total.
      • Undead: The NPC version, with +2 Toughness (+2), +2 vs Shaken (+2), immunity to poison and disease (+2), no extra damage from called shots (+1), no Wound penalties (+6). Also ignored by zombies (+1). +14 total.
      • Thirst: a specific major hindrance. -2 total.
      • Weakness (Sunlight): Roughly a major hindrance. -2 total.
      • Weakness (Wood): as Dhampir. -1 total.
      Werewolves: +8 to +10, depending upon Insatiable Hunger and drawbacks of Wolf Form.
      • Immune to disease (+1) and minor bonus against poisons (maybe +0.5). I'll be generous at count this as +1 total.
      • Regeneration: Natural healing rolls ever hour (+4) and recover most Fatigue in an hour (or less if normally faster). +5 total.
      • Wolf Form: Grants multiple natural weapons (+4), Agility die type (+2), stacking Fleet-Footed edge (+2), stacking Alertness edge (+2), low light vision (+1), and scent tracking (+1). Even with generous evaluations of the activation difficulties, that's -6 (honestly, not more than -5 would be fair). +6 total.
      • Insatiable Hunger: counts as roughly four people for food. A minor hindrance if zombies are edible, a major hindrance if they aren't. I'll be conservative here, and say -1.
      • Weakness (Silver): minor hindrance, -1.
      • Vital Creatures: as the Victim (minor) hindrance from the Horror Companion. -1 total.
      Witches: +6
      • One Edge: +2 total.
      • d6 Attribute: +2 total.
      • Free Power: +2 total.
      As you can see, the balance between races is junk. The casters are mostly okay and the dhampir aren't bad, but the vampires and werewolves are just overpowered.

      Suggested balance changes:
      • Dhampir: Remove Charisma.
      • Necromancer: Remove the benefit of Deathly Aura. If I were a deathless power, I would not be positively inclined towards an uppity mortal that could suppress my will.
      • Vampire: Remove the free Notice, remove the Vigor increase, only d6 Strength, only ignore 1 wound level, take extra damage from called shots (they still use their hearts and brains), and be detected by zombies. Still be overwhelmingly powerful, but that drops them to "only" +9. Better than everyone else but not absurdly so.
      • Werewolves: Change Wolf Form from the hybrid form it looks like to a pure shape change power transformation. Give them AB (Super Powers) with the shape change power (wolf) and Shape Change d6, with a +2 circumstance bonus for the moon being out, and a -2 circumstance for no daytime or new moon. And since they have an actual AB, they can use their innate wolf magic to do other cool things, with a shape changing trapping. Boost Fighting as they shift just their nervous system, darksight as they shift their eyes to "eyes of the wolf", burst as they howl a devastating howl, or whatever fits the mythology of the setting. Also, this would drop their Wolf Form to a +2 ability, pulling their total cost down to +5.
      • Witches: Drop the attribute increase.
      Suggested flavor changes:
      • Replace dhampir attribute increases with "Unnatural Potential: A Dhampir's Strength and Vigor do not have the usual d12 limits. They can increase to any level, but are still limited to the normal rates of attribute increase." I've estimated that sort of unlimited growth at +1 per attribute, and it allows them to feel like supernatural badasses, that can evetually exceed other supernaturals, while still having to pay for it; very Blade in my experience. Then you could give them Adaptable, like real humans. They would feel more like a genuine blend of vampire and human, at that point.
      • Necromancer: Undead Lord does what this really needed, though it says really strange things about necromancer fights, as I noted earlier.
      • Psionics: Ditch the Spirit increase for +4 versus psionic damage, or +4 versus magic damage, or something equally cool and not available to a human. If you go really strong with this, remember to give it some drawbacks.
      • Werewolves: Covered this in my balance suggestion.
      • Witches: Sense magic covers this pretty well. If you add something, remember to gibe them some drawbacks.

      As for suggested new archetypes:
      Slayers, chosen ones, etc. The Horror Companion has a great version of this. Doable with a couple of Edges as a "normal" human, but since you made most casters their own species (and boy does that say interesting things about the setting) these might rate a separate race.
      Holy types, faith users, etc. Available in the core rules with a couple of edges (allowing humans to be really effective with Champion). Doable with a couple of Edges as a "normal" human, but since you made most casters their own species (and boy does that say interesting things about the setting) these might rate a separate race.

      Good luck!
      Last edited by ValhallaGH; 09-09-2018, 07:27 PM.
      I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

      Comment


      • Deskepticon
        Deskepticon commented
        Editing a comment
        My evaluations are very similar. I realise I under-valued a couple, mostly because I misread them (the werewolf's Regeneration for example).

        A couple critiques I have with your values though.
        1) I priced Weakness (wood) at -2 simply because of how easily available wooden weapons are (as opposed to silver, etc). This means a simple club/baseball bat deals Str+d4+4 to dhampiri and vampires... Lucille would be jealous.
        2) I priced Undead Lordship at +1, but didn't fully consider the impact it would have in the setting. Your evaluation is better.
        3) I had a brainfart and priced Undead at +8, confusing it for Construct. Other than that, and pricing Weakness(wood) at -2, everything else matches my evaluations.
        4) I misread Regeneration as "once per day" instead of "once per hour," so it got assigned a +2 instead of +4.
        5) You price the werewolf's natural weapons (claws, teeth) at +4 when I think it should be +2. SFC prices each natural weapon at +1.
        6) Concerning Wolf Form, I priced the transformation drawbacks at -3 and treated the increased Pace/running as just +1.

        Basically, I had vampires far underpriced and my evaluation of werewolves should have been +9.

      • ValhallaGH
        ValhallaGH commented
        Editing a comment
        Deskepticon Yeah, when I saw how similar our totals were, I knew they were mostly the same values.

        1) My issue with this is that Weakness (Major) deals double damage. That simple club would be Str+d4, average Str+3.33, doubled to 2*Str + 6.66. No matter how common, +4 isn't that good.
        2) I initially priced it as +1, so no shame in your game. It was while I was typing up my explanation that I realized it was more valuable - one of the advantages of lengthy explanations.
        5) I priced it like the SPC Attack, Melee; multiple attacks. Not sure why I did that, now. Str+d6 natural weapons are only +1 in the SFC, which would make the wolf form much cheaper.
        6) The transformation drawbacks are ... difficult to evaluate, being pretty non-standard. At the most generous they are a -6, and the least generous they are -2, and the actual value is probably between them. +2 Pace and +1 running die type is a +1 racial ability, but +2 Pace and d10 running is an edge, as I noted.

      • Deskepticon
        Deskepticon commented
        Editing a comment
        ValhallaGH Yeah, I had trouble putting a hard value on Wolf Form's transformation. In the end, I just made a gut assessment; there was nothing really scientific behind it. As it's currently written, I don't see many werewolf players attempting a shift during combat unless they were outdoors and under a moon. This essentially throws all penalties out the window and functions as a Minor Limitation (to borrow from SPC2) for a -1 value. After that I just added an additional -2 for the wait-time. Had I accounted for the -4 penalty wholesale, I would have arrived at -6 value as well, but that just seems far too generous. Perhaps the transformation can be classified as a Major Limitation, for a total value of -4.

        I really like your idea of using AB Superpowers for depicting lycantropy. Might need a modified version of shape change to work, but the idea of shifting only your eyes or only your nervous system to get specific effects is nothing short of brilliant.

    • #5
      New race idea!

      True Zombie (+4)
      Maybe you were the favored servant of a deceased necromancer, or you were abandoned before the apocalypse, or maybe the ghoul plague reacted strangely with your latent mystical heritage. Regardless, you are a proud undead survivor, doing your best to help (some) people survive this infested world.
      • Heal Badly: True zombies don't heal naturally, but can be repaired with the Healing skill, ignoring the Golden Hour. Additionally, some of their death lingers, inflicting -1 to all Agility and Smarts rolls. (-4)
      • Living Magic: True zombies can't learn an Arcane Background. All magical potential is tied up keeping them ambulatory. (-2)
      • Meat People: You don't eat humans. But you could and everyone knows it. -2 Charisma when dealing with living creatures (humans, mages, werewolves, etc.). (-1)
      • Undead American: +2 Toughness, +2 to recover from Shaken, immune to disease and poison, ignore one level of Wound penalties, no additional damage from called shots, does not breathe. (+11)
      • Weakness (Head Shot): In addition to the normal +4 damage, a called shot to the head deals +2 damage to true zombies, for a total of +6 damage. (-1)
      • Zombies Unite!: Plague ghouls sense you as one of them - just another walking corpse to be left alone. They'll still defend themselves if attacked, and this does nothing to protect your companions. (+1)
      I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

      Comment


      • #6
        Another thought. You could make some of the excess abilities into Racial Edges.
        You're rational, sir. It's only us crazy people who get to swap out realities on a whim.

        Comment


        • #7
          Woo! Lots of replies! It's gonna take a while to respond to everything.

          Originally posted by Deskepticon View Post
          • You give necromancers the Necromancer Edge for free, but only if they meet the requirements. This, frankly, is bad design. It creates a situation where all necromancers are essentially shoehorned, and any builds that deviate from that path are penalized. Either give them Edge or don't. Necromancers should probably also receive the zombie power for free as well, since that's their whole thing. Otherwise you can end up with necromancers that can't use their main ability.
          This is easy enough to remedy. Thanks!

          Originally posted by Deskepticon View Post
          • The Blood Pool mechanic is unique to vampires, and I question if it's even needed as it causes the Thirst ability to be broken. I'm assuming 1 blood point is recovered by drinking a pint of blood, but you lable Thirst as a Major Habit, which links it to the Fatigue mechanic. Vampires also need to spend a blood point to even wake up, meaning you have two competing mechanics tied to the blood thirst. My suggestion is to get rid of Blood Pool, since it's an unique mechanic only used by vampires and just adds extra bookkeeping. Alternatively, don't classify Thirst as the Habit Hindrance and flesh out how Blood Pool works.
          I added it mostly because I find a lot of the races are rather bland. This still isn't even half of what vampires would get in, say, a VTM game (and I won't use that because White Wolf/Onyx Path are bad people who do very shady things, and I won't support them). Races can be fairly bland in fantasy games, but I find SW races to be similar. They just don't get much. A few minor attribute adjustments or very minor abilities. I wanted some races with some oomph, so I deliberately ramped these up.

          The idea here is that vampires have to drink blood. It's both a source of power and their requirement, and the major way they wear out, weaken, and expire. I could ditch the wake-up requirement if I can reconcile the other ones.

          Originally posted by Deskepticon View Post
          • Hypnotic Gaze is redundant. The Edge lets a vampire make a Spirit roll to improve the target's disposition prior to using Persuasion... which is the skill used to change a target's disposition. Why not just have the Edge provide a +2 to Persuasion?
          Is there a power that does something similar? Might be able ot just use that.

          Originally posted by Deskepticon View Post
          • Wolf Form doesn't say if the transformation is a full round action or standard action. Can a werewolf mid-transformation still take other actions? If not, making them wait 2 whole turns to do anything is pretty brutal... and that's on a success. I would reduce all transformation times by one round. So a success makes the transformation take one round and a raise makes it instant, while a failure takes 2 rounds.
          Standard, I figure.

          Originally posted by Deskepticon View Post
          • Hybrid Beast Form. You include a Charisma penalty to this Edge, but then say the beast cannot perform any actions other than destruction. So that Charisma penalty is entirely pointless since it will never see any use.
          Hm. Easily discarded. Or maybe an Edge that allows control of the hybrid form?

          Originally posted by Deskepticon View Post
          • Witches... I'm unclear on their detect/conceal arcana ability. It says it "follows all normal rules", which I take to mean characters still need to spend PP to cast it and can suffer backlash, etc. But does this also mean that the power counts against the witch's starting powers, or is it an additional power?
          It's an additional power. I figure they could do it for free, though.

          Originally posted by Deskepticon View Post
          That's about it. I'd be interested to see more about this setting, if you're willing to share.
          It's modern day, 2018. In 2016, a little under two years ago, the Plague hit. It needs no other names because it's the Plague to end all plagues. Even the world's best seers and visionaries didn't see it coming, save perhaps two or three days before it happen. They were all afflicted (as were many humans) with dreams and visions of a nightmarish world wracked by death and darkness. Then a storm hit. The Plague came, appearing in several places seemingly at once. No one knew what it was at first. By the time anyone did, it had spread too far. Now we're in a world where zombies, terrible specters, and worse things. Zombies of human, animal, and monstrous varieties. Death gods. Freak weather and dark miasmas that seem to corrupt the very land itself.

          Into all this were thrust supernatural creatures, who must fight in their own ways to survive a world as hostile to them as it is the poor mortals caught up in it. I'll PM you a little in-character piece I wrote for it, sort of a setting guideline for the novel that inspires the game setting.

          Comment


          • #8
            Originally posted by ValhallaGH View Post
            [LIST][*]Dhampir: Remove Charisma.[*]Necromancer: Remove the benefit of Deathly Aura. If I were a deathless power, I would not be positively inclined towards an uppity mortal that could suppress my will.[*]Vampire: Remove the free Notice, remove the Vigor increase, only d6 Strength, only ignore 1 wound level, take extra damage from called shots (they still use their hearts and brains), and be detected by zombies. Still be overwhelmingly powerful, but that drops them to "only" +9. Better than everyone else but not absurdly so.[*]Werewolves: Change Wolf Form from the hybrid form it looks like to a pure shape change power transformation. Give them AB (Super Powers) with the shape change power (wolf) and Shape Change d6, with a +2 circumstance bonus for the moon being out, and a -2 circumstance for no daytime or new moon. And since they have an actual AB, they can use their innate wolf magic to do other cool things, with a shape changing trapping. Boost Fighting as they shift just their nervous system, darksight as they shift their eyes to "eyes of the wolf", burst as they howl a devastating howl, or whatever fits the mythology of the setting. Also, this would drop their Wolf Form to a +2 ability, pulling their total cost down to +5.[*]Witches: Drop the attribute increase.
            I think what I'd rather do is have everyone close to dhampir level. The only problem there is that it seems like it'd be tough to do without making vampires and werewolves very bland, and not much different from regular humans. I suppose the only problem with a minimalist system is that it's tough to avoid that. I don't want playable non-human races to be so bland. I'm fine with giving them some extra power. I don't imagine the system will break, and the setting accommodates quite a bit.

            As it is, vampires have none of the super-speed or incredible strength that they're typically known for. Even heightened senses powers in this game seem pretty tame, and those are always some of my favorites. I'm trying to see how I can push the system without breaking things, even if that means higher-powered races than most settings end up with. Does that make sense?

            Comment


            • ValhallaGH
              ValhallaGH commented
              Editing a comment
              Minimum Strength d8, average Strength d10, Novice limit Strength d12+2, Legendary limit Strength d12+4 is really strong. Strong enough that it works for, and feels like, demi-god strength; especially if you've got magic that can boost it one or two steps for short periods.
              Your vampires have incredible physical strength.

          • #9
            Claire Redfield There's nothing wrong with starting the character's off at a higher level, but you'll want to try to keep their Racial Ability Scores within one point of each other, two at the most. I understand your concern that the races would appear bland or underpowered, but the races are only the first step in the character creation process. Players will still take Hindrances to buy more Edges or abilities. And even then, they're still Novice characters with 0 XP... there's plenty of room for improvement over the course of the game.

            Comment


            • #10
              Originally posted by Claire Redfield View Post
              I don't want playable non-human races to be so bland. I'm fine with giving them some extra power.
              Power is not inherently interesting.
              Your Dhampir are powerful. They're unnaturally charming, really buff, can see in the dark, and have a kind of vampire radar that can notice other undead. That makes them powerful.
              What it doesn't do is make them interesting. They're basically humans that traded away human versatility (and all the cool stuff that comes with it) for an increase in Strength and Vigor. Their only inhuman abilities are the dark vision (comparable to having NVGs) and the "walking corpse sense"; even those aren't particularly interesting, though it makes them great for night guards.
              The disease immunity can be interesting - it's a potent defense - but only if a character makes it interesting.

              Similarly, the Masquerade style vampires are not inherently interesting. Sure, they're stronger and tougher than humans, often with super speed (because Celerity was so over powered), but they were mostly dull adolescent power fantasies. It was only when players and storytellers had cool things happen that vampires were more interesting than pretentious mobsters.
              Having to manage blood supplies, forcing vampires to keep a herd of uninfected humans alive? That's interesting. Having to deal with other vampires trying to poach your herd? That's interesting.
              Being able to slap people across the room? That's empowering but boring. Like a One Punch Man fight scene, all the tension would be about the characters that weren't unstoppable.

              Werewolves can be very interesting, or boring, depending upon the type of werewolf you're going for.
              If you want an Apocalypse or Forsaken style, with a range of forms and tons of violent hippy lore, then that's one approach, and your build kind of fits that.
              If you want them to be naturally magical shape changers that turn into wolves then my suggestion would be more interesting. Because each of them would have the ability to learn and master partial shifts that let them merge the benefits of man and wolf.

              In summary: Cool things are not always powerful; powerful things are not always cool.

              Originally posted by Claire Redfield View Post
              As it is, vampires have none of the super-speed or incredible strength that they're typically known for. Even heightened senses powers in this game seem pretty tame, and those are always some of my favorites. I'm trying to see how I can push the system without breaking things, even if that means higher-powered races than most settings end up with. Does that make sense?
              You may want to go the other direction, increasing the power of everything, with Rifts-like Iconic Frameworks.
              Basically, each Framework represents a set of archetypes of the setting, and the Frameworks are balanced against each other.
              So you might have Vampires as their own framework, because all Vamps have a bunch of similar foundation abilities, and other frameworks might be Soldier, Scavenger, McGuyver, Stalker, Death Lord, and a few others that fit.

              The Frameworks that are for humans and near-humans would have some cool stuff built into them representing what sets them apart and the crap they've had to go through to get to where they started the campaign. Probably a random table to roll on, that gives a set of Advance-like options or notable gear, for that entire class of frameworks.
              By restricting framework access, you have another tool to keep the powerful races from being too show-stealing. And by making certain races into frameworks, you declare those races to be so powerful that they can't do anything besides be what they are.

              I have a few thoughts on this direction, if you are interested.
              Last edited by ValhallaGH; 09-14-2018, 05:29 PM.
              I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

              Comment


              • #11
                Claire Redfield After reading the background you sent me, the vibe I get from this setting is hopelessness and despondancy. It's not just about finding food and shelter, and occasionally fighting off a roaming pack of zombies... it's also about not losing your mind in the process and putting a bullet through your skull.

                With that said, I really don't understand the desire to inject even more power into the characters. Sure, they're survivers so maybe they can have a bit more experience under their belts, but they should still feel the weight of the world pressing down on them. Starting all the races at +6 seems fair, but I would not go higher than that.

                The other thing I think this setting needs is clearly defined themes. One I would suggest is "Living v. Dead". Dhampir, from what I can tell, are still alive (they just crave blood on occasion), but vampires should almost definately be the enemy. They should be another threat for survivors to watch out for. Merciless beasts that raid settlements and kidnap humans for their blood farms. I picture vampires as solitary figures as they would ostensibly be competing against each other, in much the same way the human tribes would be competing for resources. They aren't interested in preserving the human condition; they're goals are ultimately selfish. To them, humans are cattle. There to serve the purpose of sustenance, but abandoned if it meant survival.

                Comment


                • #12
                  Originally posted by Deskepticon View Post
                  After reading the background you sent me, the vibe I get from this setting is hopelessness and despondancy. It's not just about finding food and shelter, and occasionally fighting off a roaming pack of zombies... it's also about not losing your mind in the process and putting a bullet through your skull.
                  It's not meant to be hopeless. If you ever read the novel that the background informs, it's actually a story about optimism. I can't do bleak and pointless stuff, like what TWD has become. It's why I enjoy cribbing the community-building rules from, what was it, Broken Earth? Basically, it's about rebuilding, finding a home in a world that is not unlike a medieval wilderness, where danger lurks outside the castle walls and most people have to work hard to survive.

                  Originally posted by Deskepticon View Post
                  With that said, I really don't understand the desire to inject even more power into the characters. Sure, they're survivers so maybe they can have a bit more experience under their belts, but they should still feel the weight of the world pressing down on them. Starting all the races at +6 seems fair, but I would not go higher than that.
                  Because the idea is a cool mix of urban fantasy and zombie apocalypse. It starts with imagining the usual zombie apocalypse situations that a lot of us love to talk about and theorize what we'd do. Then you go, well, what if we were a pack of werewolves? And boom! Instant fun setting.

                  Originally posted by Deskepticon View Post
                  The other thing I think this setting needs is clearly defined themes. One I would suggest is "Living v. Dead". Dhampir, from what I can tell, are still alive (they just crave blood on occasion), but vampires should almost definately be the enemy. They should be another threat for survivors to watch out for. Merciless beasts that raid settlements and kidnap humans for their blood farms. I picture vampires as solitary figures as they would ostensibly be competing against each other, in much the same way the human tribes would be competing for resources. They aren't interested in preserving the human condition; they're goals are ultimately selfish. To them, humans are cattle. There to serve the purpose of sustenance, but abandoned if it meant survival.
                  Most vampires are threats. They can't afford to let humanity go extinct, but it's only because they need to feed on us, rather than letting the zombies have us. Some vampires in the setting are good enough folks, though. They want to hold on to their inner humanity, too. They want to separate themselves from the other cannibal undead that run around in the setting. These are fewer and often faced with great difficulties. After all, how can you help a human settlement survive when you need to drink living blood to sustain yourself? Drama! Excitement! Maybe they can find ways.

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    Originally posted by ValhallaGH View Post
                    Power is not inherently interesting.
                    That's not the point I was making at all. Having interesting, useful options is desirable. "Races" that barely have anything to distinguish them from the norm are bland to me. Power may not be inherently interesting, but it's a side effect of adding interesting traits to otherwise lackluster racial packages.

                    Originally posted by ValhallaGH View Post
                    Your Dhampir are powerful. They're unnaturally charming, really buff, can see in the dark, and have a kind of vampire radar that can notice other undead. That makes them powerful.
                    What it doesn't do is make them interesting. They're basically humans that traded away human versatility (and all the cool stuff that comes with it) for an increase in Strength and Vigor. Their only inhuman abilities are the dark vision (comparable to having NVGs) and the "walking corpse sense"; even those aren't particularly interesting, though it makes them great for night guards.
                    The disease immunity can be interesting - it's a potent defense - but only if a character makes it interesting.
                    Needless to say, I'm in complete disagreement here. Creatures that have some of the strengths and weaknesses of vampires, and walk a periphery between two worlds, are cool to me. Dhampir have always been cool, in my book.

                    Originally posted by ValhallaGH View Post
                    Similarly, the Masquerade style vampires are not inherently interesting. Sure, they're stronger and tougher than humans, often with super speed (because Celerity was so over powered), but they were mostly dull adolescent power fantasies. It was only when players and storytellers had cool things happen that vampires were more interesting than pretentious mobsters.
                    This goes for literally every playable character type ever. I doubt the grizzled old murderous warrior type that has filled many a D&D game is any more interesting. Nor is the retired Special Forces killing machine that comes up often in modern games, who is aged just enough to be weathered and scarred but not have lost any of his action hero killing proficiency.

                    Originally posted by ValhallaGH View Post
                    Having to manage blood supplies, forcing vampires to keep a herd of uninfected humans alive? That's interesting. Having to deal with other vampires trying to poach your herd? That's interesting.
                    Being able to slap people across the room? That's empowering but boring. Like a One Punch Man fight scene, all the tension would be about the characters that weren't unstoppable.
                    Being powerful doesn't mean being unstoppable. Nor does it preclude any of the drama you're talking about. I'm not really sure what your lecture here is trying to accomplish; I've been telling stories both in and out of RPGs since about when I was old enough to put pencil to paper. Having a little more power than one trait increase and one very minor ability does not preclude interesting stories. Are you of the camp that it's impossible to tell good stories about Superman and gods and things like that? Because some people feel that way, but I don't. It's a little more difficult sometimes than, say, telling a good Batman or Spider-Man story, but these characters are far from even that level, really.

                    Originally posted by ValhallaGH View Post
                    Werewolves can be very interesting, or boring, depending upon the type of werewolf you're going for.
                    If you want an Apocalypse or Forsaken style, with a range of forms and tons of violent hippy lore, then that's one approach, and your build kind of fits that.
                    If you want them to be naturally magical shape changers that turn into wolves then my suggestion would be more interesting. Because each of them would have the ability to learn and master partial shifts that let them merge the benefits of man and wolf.

                    In summary: Cool things are not always powerful; powerful things are not always cool.
                    My werebeasts have always been inspired by stories of those who could do so at will, rather than the relatively more recent Hammer horror-style wolfman cursed to change under a full moon. Closer to Apocalypse/Forsaken, though not exactly that. I like your suggestion as far as it goes, I would have to read up on how to implement it.

                    Originally posted by ValhallaGH View Post
                    You may want to go the other direction, increasing the power of everything, with Rifts-like Iconic Frameworks.
                    Basically, each Framework represents a set of archetypes of the setting, and the Frameworks are balanced against each other.
                    So you might have Vampires as their own framework, because all Vamps have a bunch of similar foundation abilities, and other frameworks might be Soldier, Scavenger, McGuyver, Stalker, Death Lord, and a few others that fit.

                    The Frameworks that are for humans and near-humans would have some cool stuff built into them representing what sets them apart and the crap they've had to go through to get to where they started the campaign. Probably a random table to roll on, that gives a set of Advance-like options or notable gear, for that entire class of frameworks.
                    By restricting framework access, you have another tool to keep the powerful races from being too show-stealing. And by making certain races into frameworks, you declare those races to be so powerful that they can't do anything besides be what they are.

                    I have a few thoughts on this direction, if you are interested.
                    I would like to hear those suggestions, yes. And also, those Iconic Frameworks never looked particularly balanced against one another, true to the original Rifts. I haven't gotten a chance to play Savage Rifts, though, which I would like to do.

                    Comment


                    • #14
                      Originally posted by Claire Redfield View Post
                      It's not meant to be hopeless. If you ever read the novel that the background informs, it's actually a story about optimism. I can't do bleak and pointless stuff, like what TWD has become. It's why I enjoy cribbing the community-building rules from, what was it, Broken Earth? Basically, it's about rebuilding, finding a home in a world that is not unlike a medieval wilderness, where danger lurks outside the castle walls and most people have to work hard to survive.
                      If that is your intention, then I am sorry to say, but it does not come across that way in the background. I'm not sure if you've shared the background privately with anyone else, but I do not see optimism in it. The narrator talks about how they "should have" won against the plague, but it simply moved too fast for anyone to anticipate. Any attempt made to gain the upper-hand was subsequantly thwarted. There are heavy implications that the psychological effect this has had on society is practically irreparable.

                      I'm not familiar with the source novel, so I can't speak on that aspect. Regardless, I'm not quite sure what the driving themes of the setting are beyond: humans & Van Helsing-esque monsters survive a zombie apocalypse.

                      Because the idea is a cool mix of urban fantasy and zombie apocalypse. It starts with imagining the usual zombie apocalypse situations that a lot of us love to talk about and theorize what we'd do. Then you go, well, what if we were a pack of werewolves? And boom! Instant fun setting.

                      Most vampires are threats. They can't afford to let humanity go extinct, but it's only because they need to feed on us, rather than letting the zombies have us. Some vampires in the setting are good enough folks, though. They want to hold on to their inner humanity, too. They want to separate themselves from the other cannibal undead that run around in the setting. These are fewer and often faced with great difficulties. After all, how can you help a human settlement survive when you need to drink living blood to sustain yourself? Drama! Excitement! Maybe they can find ways.
                      You are passionate about the setting, that is very clear. That is also a very important starting point. However, I don't think your personal passion is enough to convince others that this is a worth-while setting. I will be very blunt with you, and I mean no offense, but the whole thing falls a little flat. Do not get me wrong! I love the premise; the idea of werewolves and necromancers battling zombies sounds cool AF, but I just have no idea how this particular setting aims to drive the story forward.

                      It reads like a hodge-podge of cool ideas, but without a clear vision of how those ideas intersect.

                      For example, the vampires in the setting clearly need the humans to survive in order to insure their own survival. So there should be something within the vampire build to reinforce this symbiosis, especially if you want vampires to be a playable race. Something needs to create a mutual connection between the two races. As it stands now, humans have no reason to trust vampires at all.

                      For that matter, they have no reason to trust werewolves or dhampiri either. Both want to either drink blood or eviscerate entrails, and those class features DO NOT jive with a theme of optimism... it screams, "this is a world unfit for humans to live in."

                      Honestly, this focus on drinking blood and consuming live flesh in a world where the animals themselves are unsafe to eat creates a world where the surviving humans are always on the defensive. A werewolf pack that cannot hunt deer will opt for the village's pig farm instead. And when the pigs are all gone, the humans will be next.

                      Again, I cannot see any optimism in this setting. That is partially based off the written background and partially off of the actual racial builds. If this setting is based off of a book, I think maybe the racial builds should reflect each race's role in the world, and not necessarily their physical capabilitiies.

                      Comment


                      • #15
                        Originally posted by Claire Redfield View Post
                        That's not the point I was making at all.
                        I didn't mean to imply it was. But it's a common misconception, and I've learned over the years that it's important to address those early on.
                        Originally posted by Claire Redfield View Post
                        Having interesting, useful options is desirable.
                        Absolutely. Race mechanics should both reflect the foundational abilities of the race and what interesting options set them apart.
                        Example: Humans are Versatile, allowing them to start with an additional Edge and they get to choose which Edge it is because human diversity and adaptability are their defined characteristic in most settings.
                        Originally posted by Claire Redfield View Post
                        "Races" that barely have anything to distinguish them from the norm are bland to me. Power may not be inherently interesting, but it's a side effect of adding interesting traits to otherwise lackluster racial packages.
                        Eh. Sometimes, sure. There's no reason to be afraid of powerful races. But power is not automatically interesting, and we both agree that interesting is the goal. No reason to stay married to power.

                        Originally posted by Claire Redfield View Post
                        Creatures that have some of the strengths and weaknesses of vampires, and walk a periphery between two worlds, are cool to me. Dhampir have always been cool, in my book.
                        Well, yeah, creatures like that would be awesome. I'm just not sure that you've landed there yet. Which is why I'm offering suggestions on how I think you can improve what you've got - I may be wrong, but I like what you're doing and want it to be better.

                        Per the OP, Dhampir have vampire senses and bloodlust (minor Habit, -1 Charisma), with a hint of vampire strength, and a weakness to chop sticks. They also have improved agility, undead radar, a "sexy predator" aura that overwhelms the existence of their bloodlust (unless they've fed on blood recently), and get into a fight with every vampire encountered.
                        There isn't much humanity in that. They've got some of the strength and weaknesses of vampires but they're basically man-eating monsters that have issues with one other type of man-eating monster.

                        Assuming +4 as the target race power, I'd suggest something like:
                        Dhampir - Part human, part vampire, with some strengths and weaknesses of both.
                        Adaptable - Human enough to still quickly grow into what is required, dhampir have an additional Edge of their choice but must meet all requirements, as usual.
                        Monstrous Heritage - The monster blood in her veins provides preternatural power. Strength, and it's maximum, increases one die type.
                        Vampiric Senses - Low Light Vision.
                        Blood Hunger - Blood isn't necessary for dhampir, but they desire it and gain from it. Drinking blood from a living human (cause 1 Wound, or 1 Fatigue if done with medical support) allows an immediate natural healing roll or removes one Fatigue. Ever drinking blood makes the dhampir unnaturally predatory, inflicting -2 Charisma with the living. Drinking blood within the last 24 hours changes it to -4 Charisma with the living.
                        Weakness (Silver) - Like her monstrous progenitor, dhampir are more vulnerable to silver weapons, suffering +4 damage.

                        Some human flexibility, some monster strength, the ability to use blood at the price of humanity, a bit of vulnerability, and nocturnal vision.
                        I'm on the fence about "vampire radar". I'd like to include it but I think it works better as a racial edge; a natural talent that needs development before it can be used.

                        Originally posted by Claire Redfield View Post
                        Are you of the camp that it's impossible to tell good stories about Superman and gods and things like that?
                        Oh heck, no. Good Superman stories are as easy as realizing that throwing punches means Superman has lost - Big Blue chose to engage the world with words and ideas, using his absurd power to ensure that folks stop and listen to him. All the best Superman stories are about the clash of ideas and ideals - that's why Lex Luthor is his primary villain, because Lex is an intellectual character that is ideologically opposed to listening to anyone besides himself.

                        Unfortunately, very few gamers I've met have been interested in telling intellectual stories more than once or twice in a campaign. So, they can't be trusted with a character that overpowers the world the way Superman overpowers his world.

                        That this is a question ties back to my initial point. Superman is an incredibly powerful character, to the point that many people seriously claim he's "boring because nothing can challenge him". Power isn't interesting, challenges are, and what characters do with power can be interesting.

                        Originally posted by Claire Redfield View Post
                        My werebeasts have always been inspired by stories of those who could do so at will, rather than the relatively more recent Hammer horror-style wolfman cursed to change under a full moon. Closer to Apocalypse/Forsaken, though not exactly that. I like your suggestion as far as it goes, I would have to read up on how to implement it.
                        Core rues, AB (Superpowers). 20 PP, 1 power known, a unique skill for each power (unlinked, always below Attribute), no backlash. You could tweak it to have all the powers use a single skill (probably Shape Shifting or similar), probably tied to an Attribute (Spirit comes to mind).

                        Originally posted by Claire Redfield View Post
                        I would like to hear those suggestions, yes. And also, those Iconic Frameworks never looked particularly balanced against one another, true to the original Rifts. I haven't gotten a chance to play Savage Rifts, though, which I would like to do.
                        Savage Rifts is a lot of fun, but it will skew your sense of game and encounter balance.
                        I'd love to share them but I'm out of time tonight. I'll try to get those up in the next couple of days.
                        I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X