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  • #16
    Originally posted by ValhallaGH
    Attack, Melee (5): Level 3, Multiple Attacks, Heavy Weapon, One Arm, easily removable Device, Lethal. A shining great sword, pulsing with magical power.
    The Greatest Sword (Str+3d6, HW)
    *This* is why I chose the limitations I did - he's doing d10+3d6 per attack?!?!?!

    Valhallah's build used 10 PP (*after* subtractions) - if you want your PC's to feel "above average", but not "super"-super, I'd start them with 6 PP and a max of 3 per Power (*before* subtractions).

    Along with my list of restrictions, this should give them a sense of definitely being above normal, but not so powerful they could punch a dragon and kill it in one blow.
    Savage Summaries-RAW, with added info from Clint:Combat Actions,Cover,Healing,Using Powers,Grappling,Chases
    Also:Persuasion,Better Bosses,Better Combat Rating
    And:historical tech levels,generic sci-fi tech levels

    Comment


    • #17
      Yep, average damage is 18.7 per hit, so a Wild Attack will average a Shaken on a dragon (average 20.7 damage versus Toughness 20 (4)).
      The archetype is a super-powered fantasy great sword fighter, the kind of character that should be cutting down castle walls.

      If you don't want "I kill your castle" levels of power then you shouldn't be using the Super Powers Companion. If you just want "awesome fantasy adventurers that can't smash a castle in one go" then play normal Savage Worlds fantasy, where a zero experience Novice can deal d12+d8 (average 12.2) damage per hit, with Parry 10 and Toughness 11 (3). (Really, I played this in a campaign, she was a ton of fun and Jaynee Varsk will always be one of my favorite player characters.)
      Savage Worlds defaults to "ain't no chump" power levels. Which is why I advised the OP to just play Savage Worlds - it meets his stated requirements out of the box.
      Adding the Super Powers Companion to a Savage Worlds fantasy game means that the Novice starting characters will be capable of the things you expect of a level 10+ D&D party (slaughter the starting town, smash the king's castle into rubble, rampage across the land like calamities incarnate, and so forth). And it will only get more extreme as they gain advances, especially if you're using Rising Stars.
      I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by ValhallaGH
        where a zero experience Novice can deal d12+d8 (average 12.2) damage per hit, with Parry 10 and Toughness 11 (3)
        Can you describe that build? That's some min-maxing!
        Savage Summaries-RAW, with added info from Clint:Combat Actions,Cover,Healing,Using Powers,Grappling,Chases
        Also:Persuasion,Better Bosses,Better Combat Rating
        And:historical tech levels,generic sci-fi tech levels

        Comment


        • #19
          Jaynee Varsk (0 xp)
          Attributes: Agility d4, Smarts d4, Spirit d4, Strength d12, Vigor d10 (5 Attribute points, all Hindrances)
          Skills: Climbing d6, Fighting d12, Notice d4, Stealth d4, Swimming d4, Throwing d4
          Charisma: 0; Pace: 6; Parry: 9 (1); Toughness: 11 (3)
          Hindrances: Clueless, Stubborn, Vow (minor: Knight of the Circle of Towers), Heroic (extra hindrance, no benefit)
          Edges: Brawny
          Gear: battle axe (Str+d8), medium shield (+1 Parry, +2 Armor vs. ranged), plate corslet (+3)*
          *As part of a Royal circle of knights, the GM allowed the character to have better starting armor - in a default rules game, this would have been leather armor (+1).

          Con your GM into letting you start with a Large Shield and that same build goes up to Parry 10 (2).
          Like I said, one of my favorite characters to play. The combination of naiveté, gullibility, violence, idealism, and steadfastness was shockingly fun, and the nature of the campaign let me explore all of that in a delightfully organic way. She is also the only character I've ever played to be truly frustrated by troll regeneration; she could Push the big jerks onto their butts all day, or cleave them down, but she didn't have the ability to make them stay down, and the rest of the party couldn't get up in their faces and survive.


          But! Back to the topic!
          Super Fantasy can work, really well, but you have to be prepared for the scope and scale of it. If you don't want characters smashing castles with their attacks then you should probably go back to regular Savage Worlds.
          If you find Novice characters too weak or limited then start the party at Seasoned. I ran The Red Hand of Doom for Savage Worlds, started the party at 20 experience and they had a blast. The higher rank gave them enough build room to make slightly more complex concepts come together, or shore up otherwise squishy characters.
          Last edited by ValhallaGH; 09-10-2017, 02:12 PM.
          I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

          Comment


          • #20
            SPC + Fantasy Companion to me sounds like Pathfinder really. Pathfinder adventure paths always seem to end with the Players fighting Demigods or some other such crazy thing. So if you're looking for inspiration on what kinds of adventures to run pick up book 4 or later of any Pathfinder Adventure Path and you should have an idea of the kinds of things you'd need to throw at them. Obviously no statsm, but the ideas are there.

            We did a short campaign using this idea and it was fun. As others have said, the key to making the SPC work (no matter what setting) is to sit down with the Players and build characters. Let them build cool characters the way they want, but be there to curtail any shenanigans you don't approve of. As a rule of thumb, check the NPCs in the back of the SPC for inspiration on good ways to make characters. Some characters are going to do d12+4d6+5 damage with each hit, and that's fine. They will inevitably have other weaknesses.

            As I've been gearing up for my own upcoming Superhero game I've found that the SPC actually has a good set of checks and balances going on. Someone is -10 to hit? No problem. Telekinesis, Mind Control and AOEs don't care. Someone using Super Sorcery shenanigans? Ensnare. Stun. Called shots to the hands to disable them, Energy Control (Sound) to stop the verbal components. The list goes on.

            Note: I'm not saying that you should have the rock to your PCs scissors in every fight. Let the PCs have FUN with there characters (Fast, Fun, Furious remember?) but sometimes when they're getting a big head throw in the thing that will stop them in their tracks.

            The SPC is a lot of fun, and I know there is a lot of fun to be had, you just have to be a little careful and make sure you and your players follow Rule 0: Don't be an *******
            Well, you do know what those who underestimate tigers always say, right?
            What?
            They scream “Oh, God, help me, I’m being mauled to death by a tiger.

            Comment


            • #21
              VahallaGH I'm going to disagree with your statement above about using super powers and knocking down castle walls. Yes you can build characters like that but you don't have too. You can use the super powers to make unique abilities that set you above the rest. Think Conan.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by ValhallaGH
                Super Fantasy can work, really well, but you have to be prepared for the scope and scale of it. If you don't want characters smashing castles with their attacks then you should probably go back to regular Savage Worlds.
                What's wrong with my idea of only 5-6 PP with a max of 3 PP per Power, along with all the limitations I gave in my OP?

                That way, the PC's start out significantly "above average", but not insanely powerful.
                Savage Summaries-RAW, with added info from Clint:Combat Actions,Cover,Healing,Using Powers,Grappling,Chases
                Also:Persuasion,Better Bosses,Better Combat Rating
                And:historical tech levels,generic sci-fi tech levels

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Ninja-Bear View Post
                  VahallaGH I'm going to disagree with your statement above about using super powers and knocking down castle walls. Yes you can build characters like that but you don't have too. You can use the super powers to make unique abilities that set you above the rest. Think Conan.
                  First, no, a super fantasy character doesn't have to be able to knock down castles, but whatever their skills they operate at that power level. Maybe they've got a plague ability that lets them kill a small city by having a drink in one tavern (infection with Contagion and Strong for 6 PP). Maybe they can fight the entire city militia without taking a scratch (armor with Heavy Armor for 5 PP, or resistance 10 metal). Maybe he can drown platoons with a nearby river (matter control 5 water with Range and Requires Material for 10 PP). No matter the ability, he's operating on the "I kill castles" level of power.

                  Second, Conan is an experienced but normal Savage Worlds character (probably with the Beast & Barbarians edge Loincloth Hero) - except for his narrative ability to make everyone around him an Extra. If you're in the same building as Conan then you're going to die as quickly as a chump guard when you get wounded, friend or foe of the Cimerian.
                  Last edited by ValhallaGH; 09-11-2017, 03:01 PM.
                  I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by ZenFox42 View Post
                    What's wrong with my idea of only 5-6 PP with a max of 3 PP per Power, along with all the limitations I gave in my OP?

                    That way, the PC's start out significantly "above average", but not insanely powerful.
                    Why even let them play supers? At that point, you've basically given them three Advances - just start your campaign at Seasoned and use the normal rules.
                    Do you really want the extra rules complexity just so a player character can teleport at will and give foes diseases with a touch? It seems like a lot of added complication for no added benefit.
                    I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by ValhallaGH
                      Why even let them play supers?
                      Because that was the OP's desire (ok, it was his players' desire). I just tried to offer a reasonably balanced solution while keeping what he/they wanted.

                      If the players are dead-set on having superpowers, making all of your perfectly valid points to them and saying "why not start at Seasoned" isn't going to satisfy them.
                      Savage Summaries-RAW, with added info from Clint:Combat Actions,Cover,Healing,Using Powers,Grappling,Chases
                      Also:Persuasion,Better Bosses,Better Combat Rating
                      And:historical tech levels,generic sci-fi tech levels

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        If that's genuinely the situation then there is a huge disconnect between what the players want and what the GM wants. Such discrepancies kill campaigns, dooming before they begin - someone is going to end up unhappy and not having fun, and the game will fall apart because of it.

                        It sounds like the OP wants to run a fairly traditional, if powerful, fantasy game. It also sounds like the players want to play a traditional-but-powerful fantasy game, so they should all just use the core rules but start at a higher rank (Seasoned, Veteran, or even Heroic).
                        If the players actually want to play supers in a fantasy world then they're looking to kill castles, though they may not articulate it that way. That's not the game the OP wants to run, so that game isn't going to go well.
                        I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by SteelDraco View Post
                          I would look at something like Exalted or Jim Butcher's Codex Alera series for a fantasy game with the SPC2 rules. Both would work quite well, and it seems like they'd be a lot of fun.
                          This is what immediately came to mind. I think the matter of how to build fantasy characters with the SPC has been covered. The key will be what the rest of the setting is like. In Codex Alera, one's social class was largely dependent on their level of superpower. Mundane people had little superpower whatsoever, while the most wealthy and influential members of society also had the greatest superpowers. Using this as inspiration, you could build a campaign in which the heroes can't just knock over a castle because A) there's always someone else more powerful just down the road, and B) less-powerful people serve as knights in guard units, which are still quite powerful as a collective. Further, strong heroes need strong opponents so you'd have the opportunity come up with some pretty cool, unique villains as well. Yes it'll take more work to stat out opponents, but it would be a fun setting.
                          Author of:
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                          Degrees of Horror
                          and more...

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                          • #28
                            I'm surprised no one here has mentioned Adventure Time yet. That is definitely a fantasy supers setting. (Well, science-fantasy...)

                            I figure Novice-rank Pulp-level characters under the Rising Stars setting rule would be about where Finn and Jake were at the beginning of the series. Maybe Jake has some additional Power Points for taking an extra Major Hindrance.

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                            • #29
                              VahallaGH I could've misread the OP intention. I took his question of using SPC as an additional resource for his fantasy game not having Supers in a fantasy game. I could be wrong.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Using the SPC to build magic items or monster / villain abilities can be a good addition to a fantasy campaign. You can even build special abilities to hand out to the player characters as rewards from ridiculously powerful entities. Those are good uses of the Super Powers Companion in a fantasy game.

                                Letting the players build their characters with the SPC is not a good idea, unless you want to run a Super Fantasy campaign.
                                I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

                                Comment

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