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  • Healing Disease

    It struck me that it is really easy to heal a disease. For 4 points you can cure a disease. Dealing with outbreaks or chronic illness would be very easy in a SW universe.

  • #2
    Individual illnesses? Generally easy to deal with. Touch the victim, spend 4 PP, succeed on the arcane skill roll, done.
    Note that the GM assigns a penalty based upon how difficult the disease is to resist. So a plague with a -4 to Vigor rolls also inflicts a -4 to the healing check. Similarly, a chronic illness that's morphed into a worse form (like metastasized cancer) could be at -4 or worse.
    Your kid picks up influenza at school? No worse than a -1 to the arcane skill roll.

    Outbreaks? Hard to deal with. It costs 4 PP per patient treated. In an outbreak of 150 people, that's 600 PP. 600 PP is a heck of a lot, enough that even a cool legendary cleric with 40 PP and Improved Rapid Recharge needs more than 30 hours to cast all of those, assuming no failed castings and no resting for longer than the 2 hours needed to fully recover PP.
    That's ignoring all the other folks that get infected while you're locating and curing the afflicted, possibly including yourself (touch range power).
    I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

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    • #3
      Of course this only cures the people who have the disease. Nothing is said about giving them immunity to it. You cure them and unless the infection source is removed or neutralized in the area, they will get sick all over again.

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      • #4
        I was about to chime in, but the two responses covered everything I was thinking.
        Artificer's Codex: Rules for creating permanent magic items [on Savage Worlds Adventurer's Guild]

        Eberron for Savage Worlds: A document offering material and references for running Eberron with Savage Worlds.

        Savage Bloggers Network: An aggregated feed of Savage Worlds news and podcasts on the web.

        Manifest Zone: Explores the breadth and depth of Eberron as a tabletop fantasy RPG setting.

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        • #5
          This is all true, but it's fair to say that a great many ailments that were an issue in the typical faux-medieval fantasy setting would NOT be a factor, here, depending on the commonality of magic. (This kind of taps into a broader theme I rarely see addressed in settings. In many ways, reliable and predictable magic should have much the same effect on such societies as the Age of Invention did on our own. This is even more true in settings where stable magic item construction is viable, of course--but even the presence of certain specific, reliable magics that can be performed by commonplace casters should have some degree of impact on the society.

          For instance, infant and maternal mortality should plummet in worlds where every midwife is just an AB: Magic caster with Healing and Relief (let's throw in Environmental Protection as a last element, since that could arguably be used to prevent infections during birth itself). This has a major impact on society as a whole, because one of the driving forces for medieval families having so many children was that so few of them made it to adulthood; in a world where a family farm can reliably have two kids and be done for that generation, you end up with multiple effects--not the least of which is that women no longer need to be stuck at home caring for children starting around age 30.

          Average age starts to climb almost immediately in such a society, too, because the reason those ages were so low previously is precisely because of the number of times "1/2 year" was part of the equation.

          Of course, a downside of this could be massive overpopulation, if magic came upon a society recently--people don't just stop making babies (especially if their in an era of crude contraception options), so suddenly all those families that were considered lucky to have one or two kids reach maturity are attempting to feed ten or so all the way to adulthoof. A setting where magical advancements led to massive overpopulation and the resulting famine (you can use Relief to prevent actual death from hunger, but that still leaves you with people with growling stomachs).

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          • Ndreare
            Ndreare commented
            Editing a comment
            This happened with the rapid development and proliferation of Medical Science.
            In 1600 the estimated population was half a billion. In 2019 it is 7.7 Billion.
            We just are getting to good at keeping people alive and the environment is paying the price.

          • paladin2019
            paladin2019 commented
            Editing a comment
            I guess the important question is how widespread is magic use. Is every midwife really a caster or are healing hands still a miraculous one-off in a village's life? That's something I like about the SW paradigm. If you want low magic a la GOT, have setting rule to limit casters to the number of times they can take the New Powers and Power Points edges. Thoros and Beric found plenty of other things to spend their advances on. And setting rules are a rheostat, not a switch. You can crank it up all the way to 11 if you want. That said, a campaign theme could specifically be the rapid expansion of the magic using population. The characters having to deal with it might not be so FFF but it could be a background consideration.

        • #6
          Life Evolves. So Does learning. I can imagine a magic resistant plague. Or one that creates spores that have to be eradicated via a different spell. There was one case in the real world were a plague was going from town to town with the time of infection to the time of full blown symptoms was dropping. Apparently they finally tracked it to one town where according to all records, no one suspected anything and they all died in their sleep or were too weak to get out of bed the next day. (Needs Citation) This of course will cause the disease to wipe itself out.

          Magical Diseases I have NO idea on how to deal with though. I need to read up on the DnD versions of them first.

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          • paladin2019
            paladin2019 commented
            Editing a comment
            The disease could gain the Arcane Resistance Edge and possibly become magically active, gaining its own version of AB and the Arcane Protection Power.

        • #7
          Savage Worlds is a game, not a world simulator. Like all games, logical and believably break-down as rules meant for the PCs are scaled up and applied to society in general.



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          • #8
            I should note that since the Golden Hour applies to the base power, the GM could rule that the Golden Hour also applies to curing diseases. Unless you activate the Greater Healing modifier.
            I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

            Comment


            • #9
              How world-changing this will be varies greatly based on how common Arcane Backgrounds are in your setting. If you assume that every village priest and herbalist has an AB that grants access to the Healing power, then yeah, mundane diseases are mostly going to disappear. You get something like most fantasy settings, where sick children are rushed to the local witch for healing if something terrible happens, and the local lord probably doesn't have to worry about dying from a common disease, because he'll have someone on staff or available to heal him. If an infectious disease shows up, an observant and prepared healer can probably stop it before it gets going if they get to Patient Zero, but if that healer finds out three days later that Patient Zero coughed on everyone in the tavern and then died, it's probably too late for his ability to cure disease to save everybody in the village from the plague. He can cure one person per hour; in a large enough village there's still going to be a lot of poor people that die from diseases.

              If Arcane Backgrounds are only available to big damn heroes and dastardly villains, then someone showing up to use healing to stop a plague would be a miraculous event. They won't be able to fix everyone, but it will make a huge difference for those that they do save.

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              • #10
                This sounds like a great impetus for an adventure: the prince is fallen ill with a disease that the healers can't cure. 'Turns out it's a curse! (perhaps Dispel isn't working either). The PCs can research the cause of the curse, and go after the responsible party to find the cure. Of course, they have must succeed before the young man ... turns into a mass of contagious pustules.

                All that aside, the Heal Power suffers the Vigor Penalty of the disease when trying to cure the afflicted, and definitely stick to the 'golden hour' rule. When you apply both, you pretty much guarantee that it takes more than an absolute Novice to Heal Diseases - they will at least have to have the Power Points Edge, and the resulting cost will mean that they must succeed, or they will have to wait another three hours or so to try again. And, don't forget about risking exposure ... the Healer might find themselves getting sick, too. All these factors, I think, are fairly limiting.

                I've always run my High Fantasy games with most NPCs having a slightly modern approach to sickness because of magical healing. I mean, it's better to just use clean dishes and wash up once in a while than to have to pay the priest/hedge wizard/alchemist all the time. 'still, he's happy to take your money!

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                • #11
                  The availability of magic is going to shape your world. If the player with the Healing spell is the only magical healer a village has ever seen you can get into the messiah complex. Diseases cured, wounds healed. Worship him! Why go risk your life when you can get a cushy job healing in town?
                  Looking at the price of healing potions in the fantasy companion $150 for a Healing potion, $225 with a raise. Selling some Healing is a fast and easy way to raise money. $1000 for Greater Healing Injuries and Crippling events.
                  (and as a modern day aside, think of what Greater Healing in Deluxe Version or the 23 Point Crippling Injury Power in SWADE would mean for a sports team. No season ending or career ending injuries, everyone enters the playoffs fresh and ready to go.)
                  Hmmm: That's given me an idea for a one page adventure. Two towns using a sports game to settle differences. Players can work on one side or another and Heal players during the game.

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                  • #12
                    Don't forget that in traditional High Fantasy, clients of the clerics mus also tolerate a healthy dose of proselytizing...

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                    • Deskepticon
                      Deskepticon commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Evil cleric:
                      "There ya go! All patched up and good as new. Now, can I interest you in helping me slaughter thousands of infidels for the glory of Haxtor? I've got some pamphlets here..."

                    • ValhallaGH
                      ValhallaGH commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Deskepticon That's how my second D&D character (the one that survived his first combat encounter) became a Paladin of Lathander. After getting beat up by a hydra, he went to the local church for some healing, and the cleric asked "So, who do you worship?"
                      "No one".
                      "Let me tell you about Lathander ...." <rolls Diplomacy: natural 20>

                    • Deskepticon
                      Deskepticon commented
                      Editing a comment

                  • #13
                    The big difference between the clerics of s SW campaign and real life is that in the game, the clerics can deliver on the promise of wounds healed and diseases cured. A person who took an arrow to the knee and then had that wound healed instantly would listen to the proselytizing. Same deal for the disease being cured. This is a big advantage for the clergy. They can deliver. There could be a lot more adventurers and fewer city guards for example.

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                    • Deskepticon
                      Deskepticon commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I'm sure you mean "arrow to the knee" as in actually being shot, but that turn of phrase was supposedly Norse slang for getting married. Hence, "I used to be an adventurer like you, but then I got married."

                      So to be "healed" of that wound means getting divorced... or finding some way out of the marriage. Appropriately, two things a Cleric might also help you with. Perhaps by expending a use of Turn Undead.

                    • ValhallaGH
                      ValhallaGH commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Deskepticon There's not any historical research to back up that internet claim.
                      It may be that the TES V team meant it that way. It may be that they meant the line literally. Regardless, it's not demonstrable historical slang.
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