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  • Quick Encounter Quesion

    Thinking of doing a quick encounter soon where the heroes need to infiltrate an enemy temple that has roaming patrols. Lets say a hero wants to do 'stealth kills' to thin out the wandering patrols what would you use? I was thinking of taking the lowest of either their Stealth or Fighting. Or, would you have them roll twice--first to get stealth to see if they can get in position then based on that roll how difficult their fighting roll is? Thoughts? I do love QE, so many possibilities and it really makes non-plot-non-essential-side-quests much more doable since they won't take 1-2 hours to play out--instead like 10 minutes.

  • #2
    How many heroes are in the group and what would the other s be doing to contribute towards the success of the mission? I would probably ask for Stealth in the situation that you described, as sneaking up and incapacitating a guard should not require fighting if they are stealthy enough to get the drop (at least for a Quick Encounter).

    EDIT: And I agree, QE are awesome. I just need to get into the habit of using them on the fly.
    Last edited by mikeawmids; 11-05-2018, 10:29 PM.

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    • #3
      This all depends on how you (the GM) and the players set the encounter. Is the QE single-stage or multi-stage? What is the overall mission? Et cetera...

      If it's a single-stage QE, just have them roll Stealth (don't worry about Fighting) and move onto the next character. In other words, it's all part of the plan.

      If it's a multi-stage QE, the character's Fighting die could be used in a supplemental way. Let's say the sneak needs to dispatch some guards before the QE moves onto the second stage. The sneak's Fighting die could determine how many guards he knocks out in the first stage. This is narrative, so it's not a literal number of guards. You can then have the sneak roll his Fighting die (no exploding) and divvy the result as bonuses to the other players to use in Stage Two.

      So... let's say he rolls 4 on his Fighting d6. He can give two other players a +2, or 4 other players a +1, or any combination inbetween. This could mean an empty corridor for the hacker who needs to pry open the maglock. Or the perimeter patrol is dispatched so the driver can more easily get into position.

      I'm just spitballing this idea here... but I wouldn't allow bonuses above +2 to any single character. In fact, rather than rolling the Fighting die, maybe just use half its value as the divvying bonus.

      Anyway, there's one idea...
      Cheers!

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      • #4
        It depends on the overall plan.

        What is the purpose of the stealth kills? Is it to give more time to complete the objective?

        I would just call it a Stealth roll and make it a Critical roll. Upon a failure it makes the rest of the rolls suffer a -2 penalty and makes the encounter Dangerous.



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        • #5
          Great, thanks for the ideas! Also...lets say the heroes get into a real pickle--way over their heads. How would you guys upgrade the 'Dangerous situation' damage modifiers in this case? Meaning, lets say they try to sneak in to a temple (with tons of guards) and after disastrous results (they get caught and) a fight breaks out (or chase first then fight or whatever) and you want to conclude with a fight. From how it looks the situation becomes 'dangerous' and they resolve the situation as per the rules. If you (as a GM) narratively describe (giving PC's plenty of notice) that if they fail it will be a really deadly fight. And consequences may be MORE than dangerous situation.

          Would you just run 2 dangerous situations back to back to represent the first wave of enemies then the second wave back to back etc...or would you up the stakes and say the dangerous situation is now a 'deadly' situation and instead of 1 wound on failure/BB on success, its 1d3 wounds on failure and 1 wound on success. or something like that. How would you handle it?

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          • mikeZekim
            mikeZekim commented
            Editing a comment
            The key items in Quick Encounters are:
            1) Each player gets 1 roll.
            2) Each roll has a consequence.

            The consequence can be any or all of the following:
            1) Causes the encounter to fail.
            2) Makes the encounter more difficult.
            3) Make the encounter Dangerous.
            4) Adds one or more successes to the final goal.
            5) Completes the encounter

            How things proceed depends on the plan, which is why it is really difficult to make solid comments without knowing the plan.

            Lets say that the plan is the following:
            Player A uses Streetwise to work their contacts to get the guards' schedule and patrol routes
            Player B uses Stealth to "stealth kill" the guards.
            Player C and D will uses Thievery to break into the vault and steal the McGuffin.

            The order of the rolls will be A, B, C and then D

            The encounter starts off at -2, non-lethal.

            If Player A fails, the encounter can end or the players can continue with a -2 penalty.

            If Player B fails, the encounter can either end or the players can continue while making the encounter Dangerous. (Note: this means that Player B will take a wound if the encounter continues) If Player B rolled a Critical Failure, the GM can apply an additional -2 penalty.

            If Player C fails, the encounter can end or the players can continue with a -2 penalty.

            If Player D fails, the encounter fails. The players can do a Staged encounter to continue.

            If Player D succeeds, they grab the McGuffin and make it to safety.

            =====================================
            Alternate Plan

            Player A uses Streetwise to work their contacts to get the guards' schedule and patrol routes
            Player C uses Investigation to get the layout of the temple from city records
            Player B uses Stealth to "stealth kill" the guards.
            Player D will uses Thievery to break into the vault and steal the McGuffin.

            The order of the rolls will be A, C, B and then D

            The encounter starts off at -2, non-lethal.

            As both Player A and C are doing prep work, the GM will combine their results. They start at a -4 (as if they both failed) and reduce the penalty by 1 for each success and raise that they receive until the penalty is +0.

            After A and C roll, the encounter can end or the players can continue with their final penalty.

            If Player B fails, the encounter can either end or the players can continue while making the encounter Dangerous. (Note: this means that Player B will take a wound if the encounter continues). If Player B rolled a Critical Failure, the GM can apply an additional -2 penalty.

            If Player D fails, the encounter fails. The players can do a Staged encounter to continue.

            If Player D succeeds, they grab the McGuffin and make it to safety.

            =============================================

            Stage Encounter, the continuation.

            The encounter failed and the alarm has sounded. However, the group decides to continue the encounter (as they really need the McGuffin). If the first stage became Dangerous, apply the damage and roll for Bumps and Bruises before continuing.

            If Player B succeed in their stealth kills, the encounter will continue to be -2.
            If Player B failed, the encounter difficult increases to -3. (This is a GM judgement as a way to reflect the actions of Player B.)

            As the alarm has been sounded, the encounter will be Dangerous.

            Players A and D decide to fight their way out. Player A will use Fighting and Player D will use Shooting.
            Players B and C will stealth out.

            In the narrative, Players B and C are leading the group out, trying to avoid the guards. When they encounter danger, players A and D will handle it.

            This is a "fluid" situation, so the GM says that 4 success and raises will be needed to escape with the Mcguffin. If they players fail, they will escape, but will have to abandon the McGuffin. If all the players generate 0 successes, they will be captured.
            Last edited by mikeZekim; 11-09-2018, 02:46 PM. Reason: Fixed wording.

        • #6
          Originally posted by Nostromo View Post
          Great, thanks for the ideas! Also...lets say the heroes get into a real pickle--way over their heads. How would you guys upgrade the 'Dangerous situation' damage modifiers in this case? Meaning, lets say they try to sneak in to a temple (with tons of guards) and after disastrous results (they get caught and) a fight breaks out (or chase first then fight or whatever) and you want to conclude with a fight. From how it looks the situation becomes 'dangerous' and they resolve the situation as per the rules. If you (as a GM) narratively describe (giving PC's plenty of notice) that if they fail it will be a really deadly fight. And consequences may be MORE than dangerous situation.

          Would you just run 2 dangerous situations back to back to represent the first wave of enemies then the second wave back to back etc...or would you up the stakes and say the dangerous situation is now a 'deadly' situation and instead of 1 wound on failure/BB on success, its 1d3 wounds on failure and 1 wound on success. or something like that. How would you handle it?
          What's the goal here? What are the players trying to achieve? That should be focus of the QE. A "dangerous situation" is only meant to illustrate the level of difficulty the characters face in completing that task. If you want things to devolve into a fight, just transition into a normal Combat scene, with the players heavily out-numbered and out-gunned. Don't turn the QE into a "Horde"-style beat'em-up, because that's a good way to get everyone killed.

          Remember, the success of a QE is contingent upon the success of the characters. If they fail their rolls and get caught, the QE ends; time for a different approach. This might mean a traditional Combat scene, where the characters need to fight their way to the main gate, and then transition into a Chase sequence to get the eff outta there!!

          From the sound of it, if things have gotten that bad for the characters, the best thing they can do is probably live to fight another day.

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          • #7
            Thanks guys for replies. I think as Zekim says--it is most likely a staged encounter that is 'dangerous' after the heroes are 'caught'--in his example above.

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