Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Item creation

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Item creation

    Forgive a newbie Savage. Are there any rules for creating items from scratch? I've been told to look in the FantComp and SavRifts. I've looked. I only see lists for generating loot in the FantComp. SavRifts is a little better with the TW upgrades and conversions. But what if my TW wants to make a magic sword from scratch? Is this just something not covered by SW?

  • #2
    Creating magic items is a very setting specific thing. Some settings require souls to be imbued, others require the expenditure of personal magic, and some settings only generate magical items as a result of epic deeds.

    In short, no, there are no universal and generic magic item creation rules.

    The Fantasy Companion has rules to generate found magic items, but not for how player characters make those items (again, setting specific).
    Savage Rifts allows Techno-Wizards to transform mundane items into Techno-Wizard items - magic items that require an Arcane Background or other special ability to use.
    There are a couple of settings that do have such rules, but it's been so long since I've looked at them that I cannot name them with any accuracy. Sorry about that.
    I hope you find the above post useful. And not insulting, because I was trying to be helpful, not insulting; being a pedantic jerk, that isn't always clear.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you mean 'have player characters create items' then I suggest you do it in one of two ways.
      1) Have them spend an advance to get these cool items.
      2) Have them gather 'materials' from monsters which can be used to create these items, or buy them. Then you can balance it out in the same way you'd balance out loot. It's just that instead of finding the magic sword they find the materials to make their own.

      Comment


      • #4
        That Really-Big-Roleplaying-System (TM) seems to have a good handle on it. To translate it to Savage Worlds:
        • Spend money (or gather materials if you prefer).
        • Dramatic Task using Repair (craft) and/or arcane skill. Fail and the item is ruined.

        You just need to set clear rules on how these things operate in your setting.

        Items that emulate Powers should use an arcane skill to activate. If it's a high magic setting you might also consider adding a new skill (let's call it Spoof Magic Item) for non-casters. The skill is not linked to an Attribute, cannot be used untrained, and is always considered higher than it's (imaginary) attribute... so it always costs 2 points/1 full Advance to increase it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Long ago, the SW Fantasy Toolkit provided Edges to : create an item which adds a +1 to attack, damage, or armor (up to +3, which I think is too much); imbue an item with up to three Edges; imbue an item with one or more of the caster's own Powers, with half his PP; or imbue an item with one of his own Powers that is "always on". It also gave suggested selling prices for such items. I don't want to go into any more details due to copyrights, but you get the gist of it.
          Savage Summaries-RAW, with added info from Clint:Combat Actions,Cover,Healing,Using Powers,Grappling,Chases
          Also:Persuasion,Better Bosses,Better Combat Rating
          And:historical tech levels,generic SW sci-fi tech levels

          Comment


          • #6
            Runepunk has several edges for characters to make/improve items. In general, as I recall, you bought an edge, then each advance after that you could roll to tweak an item you owned.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for the info everybody! Setting the magic items aside, how would a character go about crafting mundane items? Say a blacksmith is forging a sword. Would it just be: spend appropriate amount of money (half retail?) then do a dramatic task using the appropriate skill?

              Comment


              • Deskepticon
                Deskepticon commented
                Editing a comment
                That's how I'd do it

              • ValhallaGH
                ValhallaGH commented
                Editing a comment
                Undefined, but that's a solid way to handle it.

            • #8
              For the most part. Just be sure the player knows how long that task is taking. I know a few smiths and forging a sword can take a few hours to most of a day depending on starting materials.
              I have way too much time but do not always edit myself properly. Please do not take offense.

              Comment


              • #9
                Honestly, unless the item is meant to have advantages beyond the base item, I doubt I'd even make it a Dramatic Task, and might not even make it a roll to produce a mundane item. Blacksmith wants to hammer metal into a sword, that's kinda his thing, let him do it at material cost (like you said, probably about half item cost), spend some down-time, and voila, he's got a sword. If it's a rush-job (say, he wants to get it done in five days instead of a week), then I might make him make a roll, with each Success/Raise knocking a day off the construction time. Similarly, I might let him make a roll if he wants to make a quality product on the cheap--each Success/Raise drops the cost of making the item by an additional 5% of the list cost (min 25% in most cases).

                Now, if he's trying to forge a fantastic blade of unparalleled sharpness and balance, with delicate etchings and a gilt pommel that is, in itself, a work of art? Okay, yeah, time to break out the DT rules. Making it an obvious result of master work would be a -2 penalty, and double the base cost (back to 'list price'), but turn it into a piece of art that can sell for ten times that. Bonuses beyond that (sharp edge for +1 damage, or superior balance giving a +1 to Fighting rolls, or ultra-light design that makes it half the normal Encumbrance value, with no loss of function) each increase the DT penalty by 2. They also increase the sale multiplier by, say, 10. So a +1/+1 longsword that weighs half the normal Encumbrance would be a DT at -8, but it would be worth 12,000 gold/dollars. Naturally, a failed DT means you waste both the time and the materials.

                Comment


                • Deskepticon
                  Deskepticon commented
                  Editing a comment
                  This is a very good point.
                  The DT should be reserved for important items with a value beyond that of the item itself. Fashioning a prison-shank that would see maybe one or two uses should just be a simple Repair roll.

              • #10
                Originally posted by FuzzyBoF View Post
                Thanks for the info everybody! Setting the magic items aside, how would a character go about crafting mundane items? Say a blacksmith is forging a sword. Would it just be: spend appropriate amount of money (half retail?) then do a dramatic task using the appropriate skill?
                You might find the crafting rules in Savage Abilities useful (page 24).
                My blog: Savage Stuff. I've also written some free tools and supplements.

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by Zadmar View Post
                  You might find the crafting rules in Savage Abilities useful (page 24).
                  I was going to suggest your Savage Armoury for scratch items.

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Originally posted by Deskepticon View Post
                    • Dramatic Task using Repair (craft) and/or arcane skill. Fail and the item is ruined.
                    Ya know, as a GM, I wouldn't have the item ruined, I would give it unusual effects, or have it work normally under certain conditions.


                    SteveN

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      Originally posted by Jounichi View Post

                      I was going to suggest your Savage Armoury for scratch items.
                      Savage Armoury is intended more for the GM or player (it's about designing mechanically balanced weapons and armor), while the crafting rules in Savage Abilities are more from the perspective of the character (how long it takes to craft an item, what traits you need, etc).

                      However you could certainly combine them, using Savage Armoury to design the item you want to build and determine its cost (almost like a blueprint), and then use Savage Abilities to calculate how long it takes to create it.
                      My blog: Savage Stuff. I've also written some free tools and supplements.

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        I know this is some major thread necromancy, but I thought anyone coming to this thread via Google Search might be interested in Artificer's Codex available on the Savage Worlds Adventurer's Guild.
                        Artificer's Codex: Rules for creating permanent magic items [on Savage Worlds Adventurer's Guild]

                        Eberron for Savage Worlds: A document offering material and references for running Eberron with Savage Worlds.

                        Savage Bloggers Network: An aggregated feed of Savage Worlds news and podcasts on the web.

                        Manifest Zone: Explores the breadth and depth of Eberron as a tabletop fantasy RPG setting.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X